Art Gallery of Grande Prairie

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The Permanent Collection

About the Collection

The Art Gallery of Grande Prairie’s permanent collection currently stands at approximately 600 works of art, almost exclusively created in Alberta in the mid to late 20th Century.

The Art Gallery of Grande Prairie was designated as a Category A Institution by the Moveable Cultural Properties Directorate of Canadian Heritage. This means that due to its strict climate, safety and security controls, The Art Gallery of Grande Prairie has been permitted to receive donations of works of art of outstanding significance and national importance.

The Collection is used extensively for exhibition and instruction, and is always available for research and study. Please contact the Gallery to make an appointment if you wish to examine works in storage.

 

The Collection After the Collapse

On Monday, March 19, 2007 at 10 a.m. the historic 1929 Grande Prairie High School that was the home to the Art Gallery of Grande Prairie suffered a collapse of the southern wing of the building. No one was injured and no art works were significantly damaged. The building was built in 1929 and is the second oldest brick building still standing in Grande Prairie. The building was designated a historic site in 1984.

For two weeks following the collapse, there were discussions about safely securing the site and retrieving the art collection. The gallery sought advice from the Canadian Conservation Institute. Tara Fraser, a paper conservator arrived on March 22 to set up a recovery plan.  Every piece of art work in the collection was recovered from the building on March 26, 2007.

Over 300 works from the Permanent Collection were on view for 2 years in open storage at the Gallery’s temporary location.

The portion of the Gallery’s collection that requires hanging storage for its safe preservation was fully accessible to the community.  Artists in the collection include Euphemia McNaught, Evy McBryan, John Snow, Jim Stokes, Allen Sapp, Illingworth Kerr, and Peter von Tiesenhausen.